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Author Biwolé, A.B.; Dainou, K.; Fayolle, A.; Hardy, O.J.; Brostaux, Y.; Coste, S.; Delion, S.; Betti, J.L.; Doucet, J.-L. doi  openurl
  Title Light Response of Seedlings of a Central African Timber Tree Species, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), and the Definition of Light Requirements Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 681-688  
  Keywords biomass allocation; Central Africa; light requirement: Lophira alata; population; relative growth rate; seedling growth; timber species; Afrique centrale; allocation de biomasse; besoins en lumière; croissance des semis; bois d'œuvre; Lophira alata; population; taux de croissance relatif  
  Abstract (up) Light is of primary importance in structuring tropical tree communities. Light exposure at seedling and adult stages has been used to characterize the ecological profile of tropical trees, with many implications in forest management and restoration ecology. Most shade-tolerance classification systems have been proposed based on empirical observations in a specific area and thus result in contradictions among categories assigned to a given species. In this study, we aimed to quantify the light requirements for seedling growth of a Central African timber tree, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), taking into account effects of population origin. In two controlled experiments: a light response experiment and a comparative population experiment, conducted in southwestern Cameroon, using seeds collected from four populations (three from Cameroon and one from Gabon), we examined the quantitative responses to irradiance of seedlings. After 2 years, mortality was very low (<3%), even in extremely low irradiance. Growth and biomass allocation patterns varied in response to light, with intermediate irradiance (24–43%) providing optimal conditions. Light response differed between populations. The Boumba population in the northeastern edge of the species' distribution exhibited the highest light requirements, suggesting a local adaptation. As a result of positive growth at low irradiance and maximum growth at intermediate irradiance, we concluded that L. alata exhibits characteristics of both non-pioneer and pioneer species. Implications of our results to propose an objective way to assign the light requirement for tropical tree species are discussed.  
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  ISSN 1744-7429 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 648  
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Author Verryckt, L.T.; Van Langenhove, L.; Ciais, P.; Courtois, E.A.; Vicca, S.; Peñuelas, J.; Stahl, C.; Coste, S.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Posada, J.M.; Obersteiner, M.; Chave, J.; Janssens, I.A. doi  openurl
  Title Coping with branch excision when measuring leaf net photosynthetic rates in a lowland tropical forest Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 608-615  
  Keywords branch cutting; canopy physiology; French Guiana; gas exchange; photosynthesis; rainforest; stomatal conductance; ecological modeling; environmental conditions; forest canopy; leaf; measurement method; photosynthesis; tree; tropical forest; Gruidae  
  Abstract (up) Measuring leaf gas exchange from canopy leaves is fundamental for our understanding of photosynthesis and for a realistic representation of carbon uptake in vegetation models. Since canopy leaves are often difficult to reach, especially in tropical forests with emergent trees up to 60 m at remote places, canopy access techniques such as canopy cranes or towers have facilitated photosynthetic measurements. These structures are expensive and therefore not very common. As an alternative, branches are often cut to enable leaf gas exchange measurements. The effect of branch excision on leaf gas exchange rates should be minimized and quantified to evaluate possible bias. We compared light-saturated leaf net photosynthetic rates measured on excised and intact branches. We selected branches positioned at three canopy positions, estimated relative to the top of the canopy: upper sunlit foliage, middle canopy foliage, and lower canopy foliage. We studied the variation of the effects of branch excision and transport among branches at these different heights in the canopy. After excision and transport, light-saturated leaf net photosynthetic rates were close to zero for most leaves due to stomatal closure. However, when the branch had acclimated to its new environmental conditions—which took on average 20 min—light-saturated leaf net photosynthetic rates did not significantly differ between the excised and intact branches. We therefore conclude that branch excision does not affect the measurement of light-saturated leaf net photosynthesis, provided that the branch is recut under water and is allowed sufficient time to acclimate to its new environmental conditions. © 2020 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation  
  Address UMR 5174 Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, Université Paul Sabatier, CNRS, Toulouse, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00063606 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 960  
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Author Svensk, M.; Coste, S.; Gérard, B.; Gril, E.; Julien, F.; Maillard, P.; Stahl, C.; Leroy, C. doi  openurl
  Title Drought effects on resource partition and conservation among leaf ontogenetic stages in epiphytic tank bromeliads Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Physiologia Plantarum Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Plant.  
  Volume 170 Issue 4 Pages 488-507  
  Keywords chlorophyll; nitrogen; water; Bromeliaceae; drought; metabolism; photosynthesis; plant leaf; Bromeliaceae; Chlorophyll; Droughts; Nitrogen; Photosynthesis; Plant Leaves; Water  
  Abstract (up) Studying the response to drought stress of keystone epiphytes such as tank bromeliads is essential to better understand their resistance capacity to future climate change. The objective was to test whether there is any variation in the carbon, water and nutrient status among different leaf ontogenetic stages in a bromeliad rosette subjected to a gradient of drought stress. We used a semi-controlled experiment consisting in a gradient of water shortage in Aechmea aquilega and Lutheria splendens. For each bromeliad and drought treatment, three leaves were collected based on their position in the rosette and several functional traits related to water and nutrient status, and carbon metabolism were measured. We found that water status traits (relative water content, leaf succulence, osmotic and midday water potentials) and carbon metabolism traits (carbon assimilation, maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, chlorophyll and starch contents) decreased with increasing drought stress, while leaf soluble sugars and carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus contents remained unchanged. The different leaf ontogenetic stages showed only marginal variations when subjected to a gradient of drought. Resources were not reallocated between different leaf ontogenetic stages but we found a reallocation of soluble sugars from leaf starch reserves to the root system. Both species were capable of metabolic and physiological adjustments in response to drought. Overall, this study advances our understanding of the resistance of bromeliads faced with increasing drought stress and paves the way for in-depth reflection on their strategies to cope with water shortage. © 2020 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society  
  Address Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse, 31062, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00319317 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PDF trop gros voir la documentaliste – merci Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 943  
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Author Levionnois, Sébastien ; Salmon, Camille ; Alméras, Tancrède ; Clair, Bruno ; Ziegler, Camille ; Coste, Sabrina ; Stahl, Clement ; Gonzalez-Melo, Andrés ; Heinz, Christine ; Heuret, Patrick doi  openurl
  Title Anatomies, vascular architectures, and mechanics underlying the leaf size-stem size spectrum in 42 Neotropical tree species Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 72 Issue 22 Pages 7957–7969  
  Keywords  
  Abstract (up) The leaf size-stem size spectrum is one of the main dimensions of plant ecological strategies. Yet the anatomical, mechanical, and hydraulic implications of small vs. large shoots are still poorly understood. We investigated 42 tropical rainforest tree species in French Guiana, with a wide range of leaf areas at the shoot level. We quantified the scaling of hydraulic and mechanical constraints with shoot size estimated as the water potential difference ΔΨ and the bending angle ΔΦ, respectively. We investigated how anatomical tissue area, flexural stiffness and xylem vascular architecture affect such scaling by deviating (or not) from theoretical isometry with shoot size variation. Vessel diameter and conductive path length were found to be allometrically related to shoot size, thereby explaining the independence between ΔΨ and shoot size. Leaf mass per area, stem length, and the modulus of elasticity were allometrically related with shoot size, explaining the independence between ΔΦ and shoot size. Our study also shows that the maintenance of both water supply and mechanical stability across the shoot size range are not in conflict.  
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  Publisher Oxford University Press Place of Publication Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 1050  
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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Schimann, H.; Epron, D.; Dreyer, E. pdf  openurl
  Title A cost-benefit analysis of acclimation to low irradiance in tropical rainforest tree seedlings: leaf life span and payback time for leaf deployment Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Bot.  
  Volume 62 Issue 11 Pages 3941-3955  
  Keywords Carbon balance; construction cost; functional diversity; leaf life span; payback time; photosynthesis; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract (up) The maintenance in the long run of a positive carbon balance under very low irradiance is a prerequisite for survival of tree seedlings below the canopy or in small gaps in a tropical rainforest. To provide a quantitative basis for this assumption, experiments were carried out to determine whether construction cost (CC) and payback time for leaves and support structures, as well as leaf life span (i) differ among species and (ii) display an irradiance-elicited plasticity. Experiments were also conducted to determine whether leaf life span correlates to CC and payback time and is close to the optimal longevity derived from an optimization model. Saplings from 13 tropical tree species were grown under three levels of irradiance. Specific-CC was computed, as well as CC scaled to leaf area at the metamer level. Photosynthesis was recorded over the leaf life span. Payback time was derived from CC and a simple photosynthesis model. Specific-CC displayed only little interspecific variability and irradiance-elicited plasticity, in contrast to CC scaled to leaf area. Leaf life span ranged from 4 months to > 26 months among species, and was longest in seedlings grown under lowest irradiance. It was always much longer than payback time, even under the lowest irradiance. Leaves were shed when their photosynthesis had reached very low values, in contrast to what was predicted by an optimality model. The species ranking for the different traits was stable across irradiance treatments. The two pioneer species always displayed the smallest CC, leaf life span, and payback time. All species displayed a similar large irradiance-elicited plasticity.  
  Address [Coste, S; Epron, D; Dreyer, E] INRA, UMR1137, Ctr INRA Nancy, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0957 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000292838700021 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 331  
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