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Author Biwolé, A.B.; Dainou, K.; Fayolle, A.; Hardy, O.J.; Brostaux, Y.; Coste, S.; Delion, S.; Betti, J.L.; Doucet, J.-L. doi  openurl
  Title Light Response of Seedlings of a Central African Timber Tree Species, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), and the Definition of Light Requirements Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 681-688  
  Keywords biomass allocation; Central Africa; light requirement: Lophira alata; population; relative growth rate; seedling growth; timber species; Afrique centrale; allocation de biomasse; besoins en lumière; croissance des semis; bois d'œuvre; Lophira alata; population; taux de croissance relatif  
  Abstract Light is of primary importance in structuring tropical tree communities. Light exposure at seedling and adult stages has been used to characterize the ecological profile of tropical trees, with many implications in forest management and restoration ecology. Most shade-tolerance classification systems have been proposed based on empirical observations in a specific area and thus result in contradictions among categories assigned to a given species. In this study, we aimed to quantify the light requirements for seedling growth of a Central African timber tree, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), taking into account effects of population origin. In two controlled experiments: a light response experiment and a comparative population experiment, conducted in southwestern Cameroon, using seeds collected from four populations (three from Cameroon and one from Gabon), we examined the quantitative responses to irradiance of seedlings. After 2 years, mortality was very low (<3%), even in extremely low irradiance. Growth and biomass allocation patterns varied in response to light, with intermediate irradiance (24–43%) providing optimal conditions. Light response differed between populations. The Boumba population in the northeastern edge of the species' distribution exhibited the highest light requirements, suggesting a local adaptation. As a result of positive growth at low irradiance and maximum growth at intermediate irradiance, we concluded that L. alata exhibits characteristics of both non-pioneer and pioneer species. Implications of our results to propose an objective way to assign the light requirement for tropical tree species are discussed.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-7429 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 648  
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Author Maréchaux, I.; Bonal, D.; Bartlett, M.K.; Burban, B.; Coste, S.; Courtois, E.A.; Dulormne, M.; Goret, J.-Y.; Mira, E.; Mirabel, A.; Sack, L.; Stahl, C.; Chave, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Functional Ecology Abbreviated Journal Funct Ecol  
  Volume 32 Issue 10 Pages 2285-2297  
  Keywords drought tolerance; hydraulic conductance; sap flow; sapflux density; tropical trees; turgor loss point; water potential; wilting point  
  Abstract Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (pi-tlp), that is, a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for longer into a dry season. We measured sapflux density of 22 mature trees of 10 species during a dry season in an Amazonian rainforest, quantified sapflux decline as soil water content decreased and tested its relationship to tree pi-tlp, size and leaf predawn and midday water potentials measured after the onset of the dry season. The measured trees varied strongly in the response of water use to the seasonal drought, with sapflux at the end of the dry season ranging from 37 to 117% (on average 83 +/- 5 %) of that at the beginning of the dry season. The decline of water transport as soil dried was correlated with tree pi-tlp (Spearman's rho > 0.63), but not with tree size or predawn and midday water potentials. Thus, trees with more drought-tolerant leaves better maintained water transport during the seasonal drought. Our study provides an explicit correlation between a trait, measurable at the leaf level, and whole-plant performance under drying conditions. Physiological traits such as pi-tlp can be used to assess and model higher scale processes in response to drying conditions.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/1365-2435.13188 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 830  
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Author Levionnois, S.; Tysklind, N.; Nicolini, E.; Ferry, B.; Troispoux, V.; Le Moguedec, G.; Morel, H.; Stahl, C.; Coste, S.; Caron, H.; Heuret, P. pdf  url
doi  openurl
  Title Soil variation response is mediated by growth trajectories rather than functional traits in a widespread pioneer Neotropical tree Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication bioRxiv, peer-reviewed by Peer Community in Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 351197 Issue v4 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Trait-environment relationships have been described at the community level across tree species. However, whether interspecific trait-environment relationships are consistent at the intraspecific level is yet unknown. Moreover, we do not know how consistent is the response between organ vs. whole-tree level.We examined phenotypic variability for 16 functional leaf (dimensions, nutrient, chlorophyll) and wood traits (density) across two soil types, Ferralitic Soil (FS) vs. White Sands (WS), on two sites for 70 adult trees of Cecropia obtusa Trécul (Urticaceae) in French Guiana. Cecropia is a widespread pioneer Neotropical genus that generally dominates early successional forest stages. To understand how soil types impact resource-use through the processes of growth and branching, we examined the architectural development with a retrospective analysis of growth trajectories. We expect soil types to affect both, functional traits in relation to resource acquisition strategy as already described at the interspecific level, and growth strategies due to resource limitations with reduced growth on poor soils.Functional traits were not involved in the soil response, as only two traits-leaf residual water content and K content-showed significant differences across soil types. Soil effects were stronger on growth trajectories, with WS trees having the slowest growth trajectories and less numerous branches across their lifespan.The analysis of growth trajectories based on architectural analysis improved our ability to characterise the response of trees with soil types. The intraspecific variability is higher for growth trajectories than functional traits for C. obtusa, revealing the complementarity of the architectural approach with the functional approach to gain insights on the way trees manage their resources over their lifetime. Soil-related responses of Cecropia functional traits are not the same as those at the interspecific level, suggesting that the effects of the acting ecological processes are different between the two levels. Apart from soil differences, much variation was found across sites, which calls for further investigation of the factors shaping growth trajectories in tropical forests.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 931  
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Author Levionnois, Sébastien ; Ziegler, Camille ; Heuret, Patrick ; Jansen, Steven ; Stahl, Clément ; Calvet, Emma ; Goret, Jean-Yves ; Bonal, Damien ; Coste, Sabrina doi  openurl
  Title Is vulnerability segmentation at the leaf‑stem transition a drought resistance mechanism? A theoretical test with a trait‑based model for Neotropical canopy tree species Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 78 Issue 4 Pages 78-87  
  Keywords Neotropics, bark, canopy, capacitance, drought, drought tolerance, embolism, leaves, models, transpiration, trees, tropical rain forests, xylem  
  Abstract Leaf-stem vulnerability segmentation predicts lower xylem embolism resistance in leaves than stem. However, although it has been intensively investigated these past decades, the extent to which vulnerability segmentation promotes drought resistance is not well understood. Based on a trait-based model, this study theoretically supports that vulnerability segmentation enhances shoot desiccation time across 18 Neotropical tree species. CONTEXT: Leaf-stem vulnerability segmentation predicts lower xylem embolism resistance in leaves than stems thereby preserving expensive organs such as branches or the trunk. Although vulnerability segmentation has been intensively investigated these past decades to test its consistency across species, the extent to which vulnerability segmentation promotes drought resistance is not well understood. AIMS: We investigated the theoretical impact of the degree of vulnerability segmentation on shoot desiccation time estimated with a simple trait-based model. METHODS: We combined data from 18 tropical rainforest canopy tree species on embolism resistance of stem xylem (flow-centrifugation technique) and leaves (optical visualisation method). Measured water loss under minimum leaf and bark conductance, leaf and stem capacitance, and leaf-to-bark area ratio allowed us to calculate a theoretical shoot desiccation time (tcᵣᵢₜ). RESULTS: Large degrees of vulnerability segmentation strongly enhanced the theoretical shoot desiccation time, suggesting vulnerability segmentation to be an efficient drought resistance mechanism for half of the studied species. The difference between leaf and bark area, rather than the minimum leaf and bark conductance, determined the drastic reduction of total transpiration by segmentation during severe drought. CONCLUSION: Our study strongly suggests that vulnerability segmentation is an important drought resistance mechanism that should be better taken into account when investigating plant drought resistance and modelling vegetation. We discuss future directions for improving model assumptions with empirical measures, such as changes in total shoot transpiration after leaf xylem embolism.  
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  Publisher Springer Link Place of Publication Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 1034  
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Author Levionnois, Sébastien ; Salmon, Camille ; Alméras, Tancrède ; Clair, Bruno ; Ziegler, Camille ; Coste, Sabrina ; Stahl, Clement ; Gonzalez-Melo, Andrés ; Heinz, Christine ; Heuret, Patrick doi  openurl
  Title Anatomies, vascular architectures, and mechanics underlying the leaf size-stem size spectrum in 42 Neotropical tree species Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 72 Issue 22 Pages 7957–7969  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The leaf size-stem size spectrum is one of the main dimensions of plant ecological strategies. Yet the anatomical, mechanical, and hydraulic implications of small vs. large shoots are still poorly understood. We investigated 42 tropical rainforest tree species in French Guiana, with a wide range of leaf areas at the shoot level. We quantified the scaling of hydraulic and mechanical constraints with shoot size estimated as the water potential difference ΔΨ and the bending angle ΔΦ, respectively. We investigated how anatomical tissue area, flexural stiffness and xylem vascular architecture affect such scaling by deviating (or not) from theoretical isometry with shoot size variation. Vessel diameter and conductive path length were found to be allometrically related to shoot size, thereby explaining the independence between ΔΨ and shoot size. Leaf mass per area, stem length, and the modulus of elasticity were allometrically related with shoot size, explaining the independence between ΔΦ and shoot size. Our study also shows that the maintenance of both water supply and mechanical stability across the shoot size range are not in conflict.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford University Press Place of Publication Editor  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 1050  
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