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Author (up) Aguilos, M.; Stahl, C.; Burban, B.; Hérault, B.; Courtois, E.; Coste, S.; Wagner, F.; Ziegler, C.; Takagi, K.; Bonal, D. pdf  url
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  Title Interannual and seasonal variations in ecosystem transpiration and water use efficiency in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Forests Abbreviated Journal Forests  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Drought; Evapotranspiration; Radiation; Tropical rainforest; Water use efficiency; Atmospheric radiation; Carbon dioxide; Climate change; Drought; Efficiency; Evapotranspiration; Forestry; Heat radiation; Radiation effects; Soil moisture; Tropics; Water supply; Climate condition; Drought conditions; Interannual variability; Mechanistic models; Seasonal variation; Tropical ecosystems; Tropical rain forest; Water use efficiency; Ecosystems  
  Abstract Warmer and drier climates over Amazonia have been predicted for the next century with expected changes in regional water and carbon cycles. We examined the impact of interannual and seasonal variations in climate conditions on ecosystem-level evapotranspiration (ET) and water use efficiency (WUE) to determine key climatic drivers and anticipate the response of these ecosystems to climate change. We used daily climate and eddyflux data recorded at the Guyaflux site in French Guiana from 2004 to 2014. ET and WUE exhibited weak interannual variability. The main climatic driver of ET and WUE was global radiation (Rg), but relative extractable water (REW) and soil temperature (Ts) did also contribute. At the seasonal scale, ET and WUE showed a modal pattern driven by Rg, with maximum values for ET in July and August and for WUE at the beginning of the year. By removing radiation effects during water depleted periods, we showed that soil water stress strongly reduced ET. In contrast, drought conditions enhanced radiation-normalized WUE in almost all the years, suggesting that the lack of soil water had a more severe effect on ecosystem evapotranspiration than on photosynthesis. Our results are of major concern for tropical ecosystem modeling because they suggest that under future climate conditions, tropical forest ecosystems will be able to simultaneously adjust CO2 and H2O fluxes. Yet, for tropical forests under future conditions, the direction of change in WUE at the ecosystem scale is hard to predict, since the impact of radiation on WUE is counterbalanced by adjustments to soil water limitations. Developing mechanistic models that fully integrate the processes associated with CO2 and H2O flux control should help researchers understand and simulate future functional adjustments in these ecosystems.  
  Address Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0808, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Mdpi Ag Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 19994907 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Export Date: 1 February 2019; Correspondence Address: Bonal, D.; Université de Lorraine, AgroParisTech, INRA, UMR SilvaFrance; email: damien.bonal@inra.fr; References: Von Randow, C., Zeri, M., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Muza, M.N., de Gonçalves, L.G.G., Costa, M.H., Araujo, A.C., Saleska, S.R., Interannual variability of carbon and water fluxes in Amazonian forest, Cerrado and pasture sites, as simulated by terrestrial biosphere models (2013) Agric. For. Meteorol, 182-183, pp. 145-155; Duffy, P.B., Brando, P., Asner, G.P., Field, C.B., Projections of future meteorological drought and wet periods in the Amazon (2015) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, pp. 13172-13177; Cox, P.M., Betts, R.A., Collins, M., Harris, P.P., Huntingford, C., Jones, C.D., Amazonian forest dieback under climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century (2004) Theor. Appl. Climatol, 78, pp. 137-156; Poulter, B., Hattermann, F., Hawkins, E., Zaehle, S., Sitch, S., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Heyder, U., Cramer, W., Robust dynamics of Amazon dieback to climate change with perturbed ecosystem model parameters (2010) Glob. Chang. Biol, 16, pp. 2476-2495; Saleska, S.R., Didan, K., Huete, A.R., Da Rocha, H.R., Amazon forests green-up during 2005 drought (2007) Science, 318, p. 612; Phillips, O.L., Aragão, L.E.O.C., Lewis, S.L., Fisher, J.B., Lloyd, J., López-González, G., Malhi, Y., Quesada, C.A., Drought sensitivity of the amazon rainforest (2009) Science, 323, pp. 1344-1347; Bonal, D., Burban, B., Stahl, C., Wagner, F., Hérault, B., The response of tropical rainforests to drought-Lessons from recent research and future prospects (2016) Ann. For. Sci, 73, pp. 27-44; Wang, K.C., Dickinson, R.E., A review of global terrestrial evapotranspiration: Observation, modeling, climatology, and climatic variability (2012) Rev. Geophys, p. 50; Fisher, R.A., Williams, M., da Costa, A.L., Malhi, Y., da Costa, R.F., Almeida, S., Meir, P., The response of an Eastern Amazonian rain forest to drought stress: Results and modelling analyses from a throughfall exclusion experiment (2007) Glob. Chang. Biol, 13, pp. 2361-2378; Costa, M.H., Biajoli, M.C., Sanches, L., Malhado, A.C.M., Hutyra, L.R., Da Rocha, H.R., Aguiar, R.G., De Araújo, A.C., Atmospheric versus vegetation controls of Amazonian tropical rain forest evapotranspiration: Are the wet and seasonally dry rain forests any different? (2010) J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci, 115, pp. 1-9; Carswell, F.E., Costa, A.L., Palheta, M., Malhi, Y., Meir, P., Costa, J.D.P.R., Ruivo, M.D.L., Clement, R.J., Seasonality in CO2 and H2O flux at an eastern Amazonian rain forest (2002) J. Geophys. Res. D Atmos, 107, p. 8076; Hasler, N., Avissar, R., What controls evapotranspiration in the Amazon basin? (2007) J. 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Environ, 94, pp. 105-122; Wagner, F.H., Hérault, B., Bonal, D., Stahl, C., Anderson, L.O., Baker, T.R., Becker, G.S., Botosso, P.C., Climate seasonality limits leaf carbon assimilation and wood productivity in tropical forests (2016) Biogeosciences, 13, pp. 2537-2562; Stahl, C., Burban, B., Wagner, F., Goret, J.-Y., Bompy, F., Bonal, D., Influence of Seasonal Variations in Soil Water Availability on Gas Exchange of Tropical Canopy Trees (2013) Biotropica, 45, pp. 155-164; Maréchaux, I., Bonal, D., Bartlett, M.K., Burban, B., Coste, S., Courtois, E.A., Dulormne, M., Mirabel, A., Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest (2018) Funct. Ecol, 32, pp. 2285-2297; Chaves, M.M., Maroco, J.P., Pereira, J.S., Understanding plant responses to drought-from genes to the whole plant (2003) Funct. Plant Biol, 30, pp. 239-264 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 856  
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Author (up) Biwolé, A.B.; Dainou, K.; Fayolle, A.; Hardy, O.J.; Brostaux, Y.; Coste, S.; Delion, S.; Betti, J.L.; Doucet, J.-L. doi  openurl
  Title Light Response of Seedlings of a Central African Timber Tree Species, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), and the Definition of Light Requirements Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 681-688  
  Keywords biomass allocation; Central Africa; light requirement: Lophira alata; population; relative growth rate; seedling growth; timber species; Afrique centrale; allocation de biomasse; besoins en lumière; croissance des semis; bois d'œuvre; Lophira alata; population; taux de croissance relatif  
  Abstract Light is of primary importance in structuring tropical tree communities. Light exposure at seedling and adult stages has been used to characterize the ecological profile of tropical trees, with many implications in forest management and restoration ecology. Most shade-tolerance classification systems have been proposed based on empirical observations in a specific area and thus result in contradictions among categories assigned to a given species. In this study, we aimed to quantify the light requirements for seedling growth of a Central African timber tree, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), taking into account effects of population origin. In two controlled experiments: a light response experiment and a comparative population experiment, conducted in southwestern Cameroon, using seeds collected from four populations (three from Cameroon and one from Gabon), we examined the quantitative responses to irradiance of seedlings. After 2 years, mortality was very low (<3%), even in extremely low irradiance. Growth and biomass allocation patterns varied in response to light, with intermediate irradiance (24–43%) providing optimal conditions. Light response differed between populations. The Boumba population in the northeastern edge of the species' distribution exhibited the highest light requirements, suggesting a local adaptation. As a result of positive growth at low irradiance and maximum growth at intermediate irradiance, we concluded that L. alata exhibits characteristics of both non-pioneer and pioneer species. Implications of our results to propose an objective way to assign the light requirement for tropical tree species are discussed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-7429 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 648  
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Author (up) Bonal, D.; Born, C.; Brechet, C.; Coste, S.; Marcon, E.; Roggy, J.C.; Guehl, J.M. openurl 
  Title The successional status of tropical rainforest tree species is associated with differences in leaf carbon isotope discrimination and functional traits Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. For. Sci.  
  Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages 169-176  
  Keywords C-13; functional diversity; leaf gas exchange; species grouping; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract We characterised the among species variability in leaf gas exchange and morphological traits under controlled conditions of seedlings of 22 tropical rainforest canopy species to understand the origin of the variability in leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Delta) among species with different growth and dynamic characteristics (successional gradient). Our results first suggest that these species pursue a consistent strategy in terms of. throughout their ontogeny (juveniles grown here versus canopy adult trees from the natural forest). Second, leaf Delta was negatively correlated with WUE and N, and positively correlated with g(s), but among species differences in Delta were mainly explained by differences in WUE. Finally, species belonging to different successional groups display distinct leaf functional and morphological traits. We confirmed that fast growing early successional species maximise carbon assimilation with high stomatal conductance. In contrast, fast and slow growing late successional species are both characterised by low carbon assimilation values, but by distinct stomatal conductance and leaf morphological features. Along the successional gradient, these differences result in much lower Delta for the intermediate species (i.e. fast growing late successional) as compared to the two other groups.  
  Address INRA Kourou, UMR Ecol Forets Guyane, F-97387 Kourou, Guyane, France, Email: damien.bonal@kourou.cirad.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP SCIENCES S A Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1286-4560 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000244438100006 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 169  
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Author (up) Cochard, H.; Coste, S.; Chanson, B.; Guehl, J.M.; Nicolini, E. openurl 
  Title Hydraulic architecture correlates with bud organogenesis and primary shoot growth in beech (Fagus sylvatica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Tree Physiology Abbreviated Journal Tree Physiol.  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 1545-1552  
  Keywords development; hydraulic conductance; leaf primordia; meristem; xylem  
  Abstract In beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the number of leaf primordia preformed in the buds determines the length and the type (long versus short) of annual growth units, and thus, branch growth and architecture. We analyzed the correlation between the number of leaf primordia and the hydraulic conductance of the vascular system connected to the buds. Terminal buds of short growth units and axillary buds of long growth units on lower branches of mature trees were examined. Buds with less than four and more than five leaf primordia formed short and long growth units, respectively. Irrespective of the type of growth unit the bud was formed on, the occurrence of a large number of leaf primordia was associated with high xylem hydraulic conductance. Xylem conductance was correlated to the area of the outermost annual ring. These results suggest that organogenesis and primary growth in buds correlates with secondary growth of the growth units and thus with their hydraulic architecture. Possible causal relationships between the variables are discussed.  
  Address INRA UBP, UMR PIAF, F-63039 Clermont Ferrand, France, Email: cochard@clermont.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher HERON PUBLISHING Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0829-318X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000234019900008 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 281  
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Author (up) Coste, S.; Baraloto, C.; Leroy, C.; Marcon, E.; Renaud, A.; Richardson, A.D.; Roggy, J.C.; Schimann, H.; Uddling, J.; Herault, B. openurl 
  Title Assessing foliar chlorophyll contents with the SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter: a calibration test with thirteen tree species of tropical rainforest in French Guiana Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. For. Sci.  
  Volume 67 Issue 6 Pages 607  
  Keywords chlorophyll estimate; model calibration; homographic functions; neotropical trees  
  Abstract Chlorophyll meters such as the SPAD-502 offer a simple, inexpensive and rapid method to estimate foliar chlorophyll content. However, values provided by SPAD-502 are unitless and require empirical calibrations between SPAD units and extracted chlorophyll values. Leaves of 13 tree species from the tropical rain forest in French Guiana were sampled to select the most appropriate calibration model among the often-used linear, polynomial and exponential models, in addition to a novel homographic model that has a natural asymptote. The homographic model best accurately predicted total chlorophyll content (mu g cm(-2)) from SPAD units (R-2 = 0.89). Interspecific differences in the homographic model parameters explain less than 7% of the variation in chlorophyll content in our data set. The utility of the general homographic model for a variety of research and management applications clearly outweighs the slight loss of model accuracy due to the abandon of the species' effect.  
  Address [Herault, Bruno] Univ Antilles Guyane, Unite Mixte Rech Ecol Forets Guyane, Kourou, France, Email: bruno.herault@ecofog.gf  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP SCIENCES S A Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1286-4560 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000282350300007 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 40  
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