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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Schimann, H.; Epron, D.; Dreyer, E. pdf  openurl
  Title A cost-benefit analysis of acclimation to low irradiance in tropical rainforest tree seedlings: leaf life span and payback time for leaf deployment Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Bot.  
  Volume 62 Issue 11 Pages (down) 3941-3955  
  Keywords Carbon balance; construction cost; functional diversity; leaf life span; payback time; photosynthesis; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract The maintenance in the long run of a positive carbon balance under very low irradiance is a prerequisite for survival of tree seedlings below the canopy or in small gaps in a tropical rainforest. To provide a quantitative basis for this assumption, experiments were carried out to determine whether construction cost (CC) and payback time for leaves and support structures, as well as leaf life span (i) differ among species and (ii) display an irradiance-elicited plasticity. Experiments were also conducted to determine whether leaf life span correlates to CC and payback time and is close to the optimal longevity derived from an optimization model. Saplings from 13 tropical tree species were grown under three levels of irradiance. Specific-CC was computed, as well as CC scaled to leaf area at the metamer level. Photosynthesis was recorded over the leaf life span. Payback time was derived from CC and a simple photosynthesis model. Specific-CC displayed only little interspecific variability and irradiance-elicited plasticity, in contrast to CC scaled to leaf area. Leaf life span ranged from 4 months to > 26 months among species, and was longest in seedlings grown under lowest irradiance. It was always much longer than payback time, even under the lowest irradiance. Leaves were shed when their photosynthesis had reached very low values, in contrast to what was predicted by an optimality model. The species ranking for the different traits was stable across irradiance treatments. The two pioneer species always displayed the smallest CC, leaf life span, and payback time. All species displayed a similar large irradiance-elicited plasticity.  
  Address [Coste, S; Epron, D; Dreyer, E] INRA, UMR1137, Ctr INRA Nancy, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0957 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000292838700021 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 331  
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Author Maréchaux, I.; Bonal, D.; Bartlett, M.K.; Burban, B.; Coste, S.; Courtois, E.A.; Dulormne, M.; Goret, J.-Y.; Mira, E.; Mirabel, A.; Sack, L.; Stahl, C.; Chave, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Functional Ecology Abbreviated Journal Funct Ecol  
  Volume 32 Issue 10 Pages (down) 2285-2297  
  Keywords drought tolerance; hydraulic conductance; sap flow; sapflux density; tropical trees; turgor loss point; water potential; wilting point  
  Abstract Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (pi-tlp), that is, a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for longer into a dry season. We measured sapflux density of 22 mature trees of 10 species during a dry season in an Amazonian rainforest, quantified sapflux decline as soil water content decreased and tested its relationship to tree pi-tlp, size and leaf predawn and midday water potentials measured after the onset of the dry season. The measured trees varied strongly in the response of water use to the seasonal drought, with sapflux at the end of the dry season ranging from 37 to 117% (on average 83 +/- 5 %) of that at the beginning of the dry season. The decline of water transport as soil dried was correlated with tree pi-tlp (Spearman's rho > 0.63), but not with tree size or predawn and midday water potentials. Thus, trees with more drought-tolerant leaves better maintained water transport during the seasonal drought. Our study provides an explicit correlation between a trait, measurable at the leaf level, and whole-plant performance under drying conditions. Physiological traits such as pi-tlp can be used to assess and model higher scale processes in response to drying conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/1365-2435.13188 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 830  
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Author Cochard, H.; Coste, S.; Chanson, B.; Guehl, J.M.; Nicolini, E. openurl 
  Title Hydraulic architecture correlates with bud organogenesis and primary shoot growth in beech (Fagus sylvatica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Tree Physiology Abbreviated Journal Tree Physiol.  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 1545-1552  
  Keywords development; hydraulic conductance; leaf primordia; meristem; xylem  
  Abstract In beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the number of leaf primordia preformed in the buds determines the length and the type (long versus short) of annual growth units, and thus, branch growth and architecture. We analyzed the correlation between the number of leaf primordia and the hydraulic conductance of the vascular system connected to the buds. Terminal buds of short growth units and axillary buds of long growth units on lower branches of mature trees were examined. Buds with less than four and more than five leaf primordia formed short and long growth units, respectively. Irrespective of the type of growth unit the bud was formed on, the occurrence of a large number of leaf primordia was associated with high xylem hydraulic conductance. Xylem conductance was correlated to the area of the outermost annual ring. These results suggest that organogenesis and primary growth in buds correlates with secondary growth of the growth units and thus with their hydraulic architecture. Possible causal relationships between the variables are discussed.  
  Address INRA UBP, UMR PIAF, F-63039 Clermont Ferrand, France, Email: cochard@clermont.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher HERON PUBLISHING Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0829-318X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000234019900008 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 281  
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Author Levionnois, S.; Jansen, S.; Wandji, R.T.; Beauchêne, J.; Ziegler, C.; Coste, S.; Stahl, C.; Delzon, S.; Authier, L.; Heuret, P. doi  openurl
  Title Linking drought-induced xylem embolism resistance to wood anatomical traits in Neotropical trees Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication New Phytologist Abbreviated Journal New Phytol.  
  Volume 229 Issue 3 Pages (down) 1453-1466  
  Keywords bordered pits; drought-induced embolism; pit membrane; transmission electron microscopy; tropical trees; vessel grouping; xylem anatomy  
  Abstract Drought-induced xylem embolism is considered to be one of the main factors driving mortality in woody plants worldwide. Although several structure–functional mechanisms have been tested to understand the anatomical determinants of embolism resistance, there is a need to study this topic by integrating anatomical data for many species. We combined optical, laser, and transmission electron microscopy to investigate vessel diameter, vessel grouping, and pit membrane ultrastructure for 26 tropical rainforest tree species across three major clades (magnoliids, rosiids, and asteriids). We then related these anatomical observations to previously published data on drought-induced embolism resistance, with phylogenetic analyses. Vessel diameter, vessel grouping, and pit membrane ultrastructure were all predictive of xylem embolism resistance, but with weak predictive power. While pit membrane thickness was a predictive trait when vestured pits were taken into account, the pit membrane diameter-to-thickness ratio suggests a strong importance of the deflection resistance of the pit membrane. However, phylogenetic analyses weakly support adaptive coevolution. Our results emphasize the functional significance of pit membranes for air-seeding in tropical rainforest trees, highlighting also the need to study their mechanical properties due to the link between embolism resistance and pit membrane diameter-to-thickness ratio. Finding support for adaptive coevolution also remains challenging. © 2020 The Authors New Phytologist © 2020 New Phytologist Foundation  
  Address UMR BIOGECO, INRAE, Université de Bordeaux, Pessac, 33615, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028646x (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 997  
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Author Verryckt, L.T.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Vicca, S.; Van Langenhove, L.; Peñuelas, J.; Ciais, P.; Posada, J.M.; Stahl, C.; Coste, S.; Courtois, E.A.; Obersteiner, M.; Chave, J.; Janssens, I.A. doi  openurl
  Title Can light-saturated photosynthesis in lowland tropical forests be estimated by one light level? Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume 52 Issue 6 Pages (down) 1183-1193  
  Keywords canopy architecture; interspecific variation; light intensity; lowland environment; parameter estimation; photon flux density; photosynthesis; saturation; tropical forest; French Guiana  
  Abstract Leaf-level net photosynthesis (An) estimates and associated photosynthetic parameters are crucial for accurately parameterizing photosynthesis models. For tropical forests, such data are poorly available and collected at variable light conditions. To avoid over- or underestimation of modeled photosynthesis, it is critical to know at which photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) photosynthesis becomes light-saturated. We studied the dependence of An on PPFD in two tropical forests in French Guiana. We estimated the light saturation range, including the lowest PPFD level at which Asat (An at light saturation) is reached, as well as the PPFD range at which Asat remained unaltered. The light saturation range was derived from photosynthetic light-response curves, and within-canopy and interspecific differences were studied. We observed wide light saturation ranges of An. Light saturation ranges differed among canopy heights, but a PPFD level of 1,000 µmol m−2 s−1 was common across all heights, except for pioneer trees species that did not reach light saturation below 2,000 µmol m−2 s−1. A light intensity of 1,000 µmol m−2 s−1 sufficed for measuring Asat of climax species at our study sites, independent of the species or the canopy height. Because of the wide light saturation ranges, results from studies measuring Asat at higher PPFD levels (for upper canopy leaves up to 1,600 µmol m−2 s−1) are comparable with studies measuring at 1,000 µmol m−2 s−1. © 2020 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation  
  Address UMR 5174, Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00063606 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 948  
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