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Author Leroy, C.; Gril, E.; Si Ouali, L.; Coste, S.; Gérard, B.; Maillard, P.; Mercier, H.; Stahl, C. url  doi
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  Title Water and nutrient uptake capacity of leaf-absorbing trichomes vs. roots in epiphytic tank bromeliads Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal Environ. Exp. Bot.  
  Volume 163 Issue (up) Pages 112-123  
  Keywords 15 N labelling; Carbon metabolism; Nutrient uptake; Plant performance; Tank bromeliad; Water status; Aechmea  
  Abstract The water and nutrient uptake mechanisms used by vascular epiphytes have been the subject of a few studies. While leaf absorbing trichomes (LATs) are the main organ involved in resource uptake by bromeliads, little attention has been paid to the absorbing role of epiphytic bromeliad roots. This study investigates the water and nutrient uptake capacity of LATs vs. roots in two epiphytic tank bromeliads Aechmea aquilega and Lutheria splendens. The tank and/or the roots of bromeliads were watered, or not watered at all, in different treatments. We show that LATs and roots have different functions in resource uptake in the two species, which we mainly attributed to dissimilarities in carbon acquisition and growth traits (e.g., photosynthesis, relative growth rate, non-structural carbohydrates, malate), to water relation traits (e.g., water and osmotic potentials, relative water content, hydrenchyma thickness) and nutrient uptake (e.g., 15 N-labelling). While the roots of A. aquilega did contribute to water and nutrient uptake, the roots of L. splendens were less important than the role played by the LATs in resource uptake. We also provide evidenced for a synergistic effect of combined watering of tank and root in the Bromelioideae species. These results call for a more complex interpretation of LATs vs. roots in resource uptake in bromeliads. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.  
  Address INRA, UMR EcoFoG, CNRS, CIRAD, AgroParisTech, Université des Antilles, Université de Guyane, Kourou, 97310, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier B.V. Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00988472 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 871  
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Author Aguilos, M.; Stahl, C.; Burban, B.; Hérault, B.; Courtois, E.; Coste, S.; Wagner, F.; Ziegler, C.; Takagi, K.; Bonal, D. pdf  url
doi  openurl
  Title Interannual and seasonal variations in ecosystem transpiration and water use efficiency in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Forests Abbreviated Journal Forests  
  Volume 10 Issue (up) 1 Pages  
  Keywords Drought; Evapotranspiration; Radiation; Tropical rainforest; Water use efficiency; Atmospheric radiation; Carbon dioxide; Climate change; Drought; Efficiency; Evapotranspiration; Forestry; Heat radiation; Radiation effects; Soil moisture; Tropics; Water supply; Climate condition; Drought conditions; Interannual variability; Mechanistic models; Seasonal variation; Tropical ecosystems; Tropical rain forest; Water use efficiency; Ecosystems  
  Abstract Warmer and drier climates over Amazonia have been predicted for the next century with expected changes in regional water and carbon cycles. We examined the impact of interannual and seasonal variations in climate conditions on ecosystem-level evapotranspiration (ET) and water use efficiency (WUE) to determine key climatic drivers and anticipate the response of these ecosystems to climate change. We used daily climate and eddyflux data recorded at the Guyaflux site in French Guiana from 2004 to 2014. ET and WUE exhibited weak interannual variability. The main climatic driver of ET and WUE was global radiation (Rg), but relative extractable water (REW) and soil temperature (Ts) did also contribute. At the seasonal scale, ET and WUE showed a modal pattern driven by Rg, with maximum values for ET in July and August and for WUE at the beginning of the year. By removing radiation effects during water depleted periods, we showed that soil water stress strongly reduced ET. In contrast, drought conditions enhanced radiation-normalized WUE in almost all the years, suggesting that the lack of soil water had a more severe effect on ecosystem evapotranspiration than on photosynthesis. Our results are of major concern for tropical ecosystem modeling because they suggest that under future climate conditions, tropical forest ecosystems will be able to simultaneously adjust CO2 and H2O fluxes. Yet, for tropical forests under future conditions, the direction of change in WUE at the ecosystem scale is hard to predict, since the impact of radiation on WUE is counterbalanced by adjustments to soil water limitations. Developing mechanistic models that fully integrate the processes associated with CO2 and H2O flux control should help researchers understand and simulate future functional adjustments in these ecosystems.  
  Address Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0808, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Mdpi Ag Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 19994907 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Export Date: 1 February 2019; Correspondence Address: Bonal, D.; Université de Lorraine, AgroParisTech, INRA, UMR SilvaFrance; email: damien.bonal@inra.fr; References: Von Randow, C., Zeri, M., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Muza, M.N., de Gonçalves, L.G.G., Costa, M.H., Araujo, A.C., Saleska, S.R., Interannual variability of carbon and water fluxes in Amazonian forest, Cerrado and pasture sites, as simulated by terrestrial biosphere models (2013) Agric. For. Meteorol, 182-183, pp. 145-155; Duffy, P.B., Brando, P., Asner, G.P., Field, C.B., Projections of future meteorological drought and wet periods in the Amazon (2015) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, pp. 13172-13177; Cox, P.M., Betts, R.A., Collins, M., Harris, P.P., Huntingford, C., Jones, C.D., Amazonian forest dieback under climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century (2004) Theor. Appl. Climatol, 78, pp. 137-156; Poulter, B., Hattermann, F., Hawkins, E., Zaehle, S., Sitch, S., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Heyder, U., Cramer, W., Robust dynamics of Amazon dieback to climate change with perturbed ecosystem model parameters (2010) Glob. Chang. Biol, 16, pp. 2476-2495; Saleska, S.R., Didan, K., Huete, A.R., Da Rocha, H.R., Amazon forests green-up during 2005 drought (2007) Science, 318, p. 612; Phillips, O.L., Aragão, L.E.O.C., Lewis, S.L., Fisher, J.B., Lloyd, J., López-González, G., Malhi, Y., Quesada, C.A., Drought sensitivity of the amazon rainforest (2009) Science, 323, pp. 1344-1347; Bonal, D., Burban, B., Stahl, C., Wagner, F., Hérault, B., The response of tropical rainforests to drought-Lessons from recent research and future prospects (2016) Ann. For. Sci, 73, pp. 27-44; Wang, K.C., Dickinson, R.E., A review of global terrestrial evapotranspiration: Observation, modeling, climatology, and climatic variability (2012) Rev. Geophys, p. 50; Fisher, R.A., Williams, M., da Costa, A.L., Malhi, Y., da Costa, R.F., Almeida, S., Meir, P., The response of an Eastern Amazonian rain forest to drought stress: Results and modelling analyses from a throughfall exclusion experiment (2007) Glob. Chang. Biol, 13, pp. 2361-2378; Costa, M.H., Biajoli, M.C., Sanches, L., Malhado, A.C.M., Hutyra, L.R., Da Rocha, H.R., Aguiar, R.G., De Araújo, A.C., Atmospheric versus vegetation controls of Amazonian tropical rain forest evapotranspiration: Are the wet and seasonally dry rain forests any different? (2010) J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci, 115, pp. 1-9; Carswell, F.E., Costa, A.L., Palheta, M., Malhi, Y., Meir, P., Costa, J.D.P.R., Ruivo, M.D.L., Clement, R.J., Seasonality in CO2 and H2O flux at an eastern Amazonian rain forest (2002) J. Geophys. Res. D Atmos, 107, p. 8076; Hasler, N., Avissar, R., What controls evapotranspiration in the Amazon basin? (2007) J. Hydrometeorol, 8, pp. 380-395; Da Rocha, H.R., Manzi, A.O., Cabral, O.M., Miller, S.D., Goulden, M.L., Saleska, S.R., Coupe, N.R., Artaxo, R., Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in brazil (2009) J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci, p. 114; Kim, Y., Knox, R.G., Longo, M., Medvigy, D., Hutyra, L.R., Pyle, E.H., Wofsy, S.C., Moorcroft, P.R., Seasonal carbon dynamics and water fluxes in an Amazon rainforest (2012) Glob. Chang. Biol, 18, pp. 1322-1334; Maeda, E.E., Ma, X., Wagner, F.H., Kim, H., Oki, T., Eamus, D., Huete, A., Evapotranspiration seasonality across the Amazon Basin (2017) Earth Syst. Dyn, 8, pp. 439-454; Farquhar, G.D., Ehleringer, J.R., Hubick, K.T., Carbon isotope discrimination and photosynthesis (1989) Ann. Rev. Plant Physiol, 40, pp. 503-537; Hutyra, L.R., Munger, J.W., Saleska, S.R., Gottlieb, E., Daube, B.C., Dunn, A.L., Amaral, D.F., Wofsy, S.C., Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest (2007) J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosci; Negrón Juárez, R.I., Hodnett, M.G., Fu, R., Gouden, M.L., von Randow, C., Control of dry season evapotranspiration over the Amazonian forest as inferred from observation at a Southern Amazon forest site (2007) J. Clim, 20, pp. 2827-2839; Fisher, J.B., Malhi, Y., Bonal, D., Da Rocha, H.R., De Araújo, A.C., Gamo, M., Goulden, M.L., Kondo, H., The land-atmosphere water flux in the tropics (2009) Glob. Chang. Biol; Christoffersen, B.O., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Arain, M.A., Baker, I.T., Cestaro, B.P., Ciais, P., Fisher, J.B., Gulden, L., Mechanisms of water supply and vegetation demand govern the seasonality and magnitude of evapotranspiration in Amazonia and Cerrado (2014) Agric. For. Meteorol, 191, pp. 33-50; Da Costa, A.C.L., Rowland, L., Oliveira, R.S., Oliveira, A.A.R., Binks, O.J., Salmon, Y., Vasconcelos, S.S., Poyatos, R., Stand dynamics modulate water cycling and mortality risk in droughted tropical forest (2018) Glob. Chang. Biol; Huang, M., Piao, S., Sun, Y., Ciais, P., Cheng, L., Mao, J., Poulter, B., Wang, Y., Change in terrestrial ecosystem water-use efficiency over the last three decades (2015) Glob. Chang. Biol; Brienen, R.J.W., Wanek, W., Hietz, P., Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings indicate improved water use efficiency and drought responses of a tropical dry forest tree species (2011) Trees, 25, pp. 103-113; Yu, G., Song, X., Wang, Q., Liu, Y., Guan, D., Yan, J., Sun, X., Wen, X., Water-use efficiency of forest ecosystems in eastern China and its relations to climatic variables (2008) New Phytol, 177, pp. 927-937; Aguilos, M., Hérault, B., Burban, B., Wagner, F., Bonal, D., What drives long-term variations in carbon flux and balance in a tropical rainforest in French Guiana? Agric (2018) For. Meteorol, pp. 253-254; Bonal, D., Bosc, A., Ponton, S., Goret, J.Y., Burban, B.T., Gross, P., Bonnefond, J.M., Epron, D., Impact of severe dry season on net ecosystem exchange in the Neotropical rainforest of French Guiana (2008) Glob. Chang. Biol; Aubinet, M., Grelle, A., Ibrom, A., Rannik, U., Moncrieff, J.B., Foken, T., Kowalski, A.S., Bernhofer, C., Estimates of the annual net carbon and water exchange of forests: The Euroflux methodology (2000) Adv. Ecol. Res, 30, pp. 113-175; Wagner, F., Hérault, B., Stahl, C., Bonal, D., Rossi, V., Modeling water availability for trees in tropical forests (2011) Agric. For. Meteorol, 151, pp. 1202-1213; Kuglitsch, F.G., Reichstein, M., Beer, C., Carrara, A., Ceulemans, R., Granier, A., Janssens, I.A., Loustau, D., Characterisation of ecosystem water-use efficiency of european forests from eddy covariance measurements (2008) Biogeosci. Discuss, 5, pp. 4481-4519; Dekker, S.C., Groenendijk, M., Booth, B.B.B., Huntingford, C., Cox, P.M., Spatial and temporal variations in plant water-use efficiency inferred from tree-ring, eddy covariance and atmospheric observations (2016) Earth Syst. Dyn, 7, pp. 525-533; Yang, Y., Guan, H., Batelaan, O., McVicar, T.R., Long, D., Piao, S., Liang, W., Simmons, C.T., Contrasting responses of water use efficiency to drought across global terrestrial ecosystems (2016) Sci. Rep, 6, p. 23284; Granier, A., Bréda, N., Biron, P., Villette, S., A lumped water balance model to evaluate duration and intensity of drought constraints in forest stands (1999) Ecol. Model, 116, pp. 269-283; Kume, T., Takizawa, H., Yoshifuji, N., Tanaka, K., Tantasirin, C., Tanaka, N., Suzuki, M., Impact of soil drought on sap flow and water status of evergreen trees in a tropical monsoon forest in northern Thailand (2007) For. Ecol. Manag, 238, pp. 220-230; Xiao, J., Sun, G., Chen, J., Chen, H., Chen, S., Dong, G., Gao, S., Han, S., Carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration, and water use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems in China (2013) Agric. For. Meteorol; Boese, S., Jung, M., Carvalhais, N., Reichstein, M., The importance of radiation for semi-empirical water-use efficiency models (2017) Biogeosciences, 14, pp. 3015-3026; Bonal, D., Ponton, S., Le Thiec, D., Richard, B., Ningre, N., Hérault, B., Ogée, J., Sabatier, D., Leaf functional response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last century in two northern Amazonian tree species: An historical δ13C and δ18O approach using herbarium samples (2011) Plant Cell Environ, 34, pp. 1332-1344; Wagner, F., Rossi, V., Stahl, C., Bonal, D., Hérault, B., Water availability is the main climate driver of neotropical tree growth (2012) PLoS ONE, 7; Van der Molen, M.K., Dolman, A.J., Ciais, P., Eglin, T., Gobron, N., Law, B.E., Meir, P., Reichstein, M., Drought and ecosystem carbon cycling (2011) Agric. For. Meteorol, 151, pp. 765-773; Allen, C.D., Macalady, A.K., Chenchouni, H., Bachelet, D., McDowell, N., Vennetier, M., Kitzberger, T., Hogg, E.H., A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests (2010) For. Ecol. Manag, 259, pp. 660-684; Da Rocha, H.R., Goulden, M.L., Miller, S.D., Menton, M.C., Pinto, L.D., De Freitas, H.C., Seasonality of water and heat fluxes over a tropical forest in eastern Amazonia (2004) Ecol. Appl, 14, pp. 22-32; Baldocchi, D., Falge, E., Gu, L., Olson, R., Hollinger, D., Running, S., Anthoni, P., Evans, R., FLUXNET: A New tool to study the temporal and spatial variability of ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy flux densities (2001) Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc, 82, pp. 2415-2434; Stahl, C., Hérault, B., Rossi, V., Burban, B., Bréchet, C., Bonal, D., Depth of soil water uptake by tropical rainforest trees during dry periods: Does tree dimension matter? (2013) Oecologia, 173, pp. 1191-1201; Nepstad, D.C., De Carvalho, C.R., Davidson, E.A., Jipp, P.H., Lefebvre, P.A., Negreiros, G.H., Da Silva, E.D., Vieira, S., The role of deep roots in the hydrological and carbon cycles of Amazonian forests and pastures (1994) Nature; Lee, J.-E., Boyce, K., Impact of the hydraulic capacity of plants on water and carbon fluxes in tropical South America (2010) J. Geophys. Res; Xiao, X., Zhang, Q., Saleska, S., Hutyra, L., De Camargo, P., Wofsy, S., Frolking, S., Moore, B., Satellite-based modeling of gross primary production in a seasonally moist tropical evergreen forest (2005) Remote Sens. Environ, 94, pp. 105-122; Wagner, F.H., Hérault, B., Bonal, D., Stahl, C., Anderson, L.O., Baker, T.R., Becker, G.S., Botosso, P.C., Climate seasonality limits leaf carbon assimilation and wood productivity in tropical forests (2016) Biogeosciences, 13, pp. 2537-2562; Stahl, C., Burban, B., Wagner, F., Goret, J.-Y., Bompy, F., Bonal, D., Influence of Seasonal Variations in Soil Water Availability on Gas Exchange of Tropical Canopy Trees (2013) Biotropica, 45, pp. 155-164; Maréchaux, I., Bonal, D., Bartlett, M.K., Burban, B., Coste, S., Courtois, E.A., Dulormne, M., Mirabel, A., Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest (2018) Funct. Ecol, 32, pp. 2285-2297; Chaves, M.M., Maroco, J.P., Pereira, J.S., Understanding plant responses to drought-from genes to the whole plant (2003) Funct. Plant Biol, 30, pp. 239-264 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 856  
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Author Maréchaux, I.; Bonal, D.; Bartlett, M.K.; Burban, B.; Coste, S.; Courtois, E.A.; Dulormne, M.; Goret, J.-Y.; Mira, E.; Mirabel, A.; Sack, L.; Stahl, C.; Chave, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Functional Ecology Abbreviated Journal Funct Ecol  
  Volume 32 Issue (up) 10 Pages 2285-2297  
  Keywords drought tolerance; hydraulic conductance; sap flow; sapflux density; tropical trees; turgor loss point; water potential; wilting point  
  Abstract Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (pi-tlp), that is, a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for longer into a dry season. We measured sapflux density of 22 mature trees of 10 species during a dry season in an Amazonian rainforest, quantified sapflux decline as soil water content decreased and tested its relationship to tree pi-tlp, size and leaf predawn and midday water potentials measured after the onset of the dry season. The measured trees varied strongly in the response of water use to the seasonal drought, with sapflux at the end of the dry season ranging from 37 to 117% (on average 83 +/- 5 %) of that at the beginning of the dry season. The decline of water transport as soil dried was correlated with tree pi-tlp (Spearman's rho > 0.63), but not with tree size or predawn and midday water potentials. Thus, trees with more drought-tolerant leaves better maintained water transport during the seasonal drought. Our study provides an explicit correlation between a trait, measurable at the leaf level, and whole-plant performance under drying conditions. Physiological traits such as pi-tlp can be used to assess and model higher scale processes in response to drying conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/1365-2435.13188 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 830  
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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Schimann, H.; Epron, D.; Dreyer, E. pdf  openurl
  Title A cost-benefit analysis of acclimation to low irradiance in tropical rainforest tree seedlings: leaf life span and payback time for leaf deployment Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Bot.  
  Volume 62 Issue (up) 11 Pages 3941-3955  
  Keywords Carbon balance; construction cost; functional diversity; leaf life span; payback time; photosynthesis; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract The maintenance in the long run of a positive carbon balance under very low irradiance is a prerequisite for survival of tree seedlings below the canopy or in small gaps in a tropical rainforest. To provide a quantitative basis for this assumption, experiments were carried out to determine whether construction cost (CC) and payback time for leaves and support structures, as well as leaf life span (i) differ among species and (ii) display an irradiance-elicited plasticity. Experiments were also conducted to determine whether leaf life span correlates to CC and payback time and is close to the optimal longevity derived from an optimization model. Saplings from 13 tropical tree species were grown under three levels of irradiance. Specific-CC was computed, as well as CC scaled to leaf area at the metamer level. Photosynthesis was recorded over the leaf life span. Payback time was derived from CC and a simple photosynthesis model. Specific-CC displayed only little interspecific variability and irradiance-elicited plasticity, in contrast to CC scaled to leaf area. Leaf life span ranged from 4 months to > 26 months among species, and was longest in seedlings grown under lowest irradiance. It was always much longer than payback time, even under the lowest irradiance. Leaves were shed when their photosynthesis had reached very low values, in contrast to what was predicted by an optimality model. The species ranking for the different traits was stable across irradiance treatments. The two pioneer species always displayed the smallest CC, leaf life span, and payback time. All species displayed a similar large irradiance-elicited plasticity.  
  Address [Coste, S; Epron, D; Dreyer, E] INRA, UMR1137, Ctr INRA Nancy, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0957 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000292838700021 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 331  
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Author Cochard, H.; Coste, S.; Chanson, B.; Guehl, J.M.; Nicolini, E. openurl 
  Title Hydraulic architecture correlates with bud organogenesis and primary shoot growth in beech (Fagus sylvatica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Tree Physiology Abbreviated Journal Tree Physiol.  
  Volume 25 Issue (up) 12 Pages 1545-1552  
  Keywords development; hydraulic conductance; leaf primordia; meristem; xylem  
  Abstract In beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the number of leaf primordia preformed in the buds determines the length and the type (long versus short) of annual growth units, and thus, branch growth and architecture. We analyzed the correlation between the number of leaf primordia and the hydraulic conductance of the vascular system connected to the buds. Terminal buds of short growth units and axillary buds of long growth units on lower branches of mature trees were examined. Buds with less than four and more than five leaf primordia formed short and long growth units, respectively. Irrespective of the type of growth unit the bud was formed on, the occurrence of a large number of leaf primordia was associated with high xylem hydraulic conductance. Xylem conductance was correlated to the area of the outermost annual ring. These results suggest that organogenesis and primary growth in buds correlates with secondary growth of the growth units and thus with their hydraulic architecture. Possible causal relationships between the variables are discussed.  
  Address INRA UBP, UMR PIAF, F-63039 Clermont Ferrand, France, Email: cochard@clermont.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher HERON PUBLISHING Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0829-318X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000234019900008 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 281  
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