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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Garraud, L.; Heuret, P.; Nicolini, E.; Dreyer, E. openurl 
  Title (up) Does ontogeny modulate irradiance-elicited plasticity of leaf traits in saplings of rain-forest tree species? A test with Dicorynia guianensis and Tachigali melinonii (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. For. Sci.  
  Volume 66 Issue 7 Pages 701-709  
  Keywords plant architecture; phenotypic plasticity; photosynthetic capacity; leaf structure; tropical rain forest  
  Abstract Irradiance elicits a large plasticity in leaf traits, but little is known about the modulation of this plasticity by ontogeny. Interactive effects of relative irradiance and ontogeny were assessed on leaf traits for two tropical rainforest tree species: Dicorynia guianensis Amshoff and Tachigali melinonii (Harms) Barneby (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae). Eleven morphological and physiological leaf traits, relative to photosynthetic performance, were measured on saplings at three different architectural development stages (ASD 1, 2 and 3) and used to derive composite traits like photosynthetic N-use efficiency. Measurements were made along a natural irradiance gradient. The effect of ASD was very visible and differed between the two species. For Dicorynia guianensis, only leaf mass-per-area (LMA) significantly increased with ASDs whereas for Tachigali melinonii, almost all traits were affected by ASD: LMA, leaf N content and photosynthetic capacity increased from ASD 1 to ASD 3. Photosynthetic N-use-efficiency was not affected by ASD in any species. Leaf traits were severely modulated by irradiance, whereas the degree of plasticity was very similar among ASDs. Only few interactions were detected between irradiance and ASD, for leaf thickness, carbon content, and the ratio Chl/N in T. melinonii and for photosynthetic capacity in D. guianensis. We conclude that ontogenic development and irradiance-elicited plasticity modulated leaf traits, with almost no interaction, i.e., the degree of irradiance-elicited plasticity was stable across development stages and independent of ontogeny in these two species, at least in the early stages of development assessed here.  
  Address [Dreyer, Erwin] INRA, UMR Ecol & Ecophysiol Forestieres 1137, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP SCIENCES S A Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1286-4560 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000270906600009 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 100  
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Author Svensk, M.; Coste, S.; Gérard, B.; Gril, E.; Julien, F.; Maillard, P.; Stahl, C.; Leroy, C. doi  openurl
  Title (up) Drought effects on resource partition and conservation among leaf ontogenetic stages in epiphytic tank bromeliads Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Physiologia Plantarum Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Plant.  
  Volume 170 Issue 4 Pages 488-507  
  Keywords chlorophyll; nitrogen; water; Bromeliaceae; drought; metabolism; photosynthesis; plant leaf; Bromeliaceae; Chlorophyll; Droughts; Nitrogen; Photosynthesis; Plant Leaves; Water  
  Abstract Studying the response to drought stress of keystone epiphytes such as tank bromeliads is essential to better understand their resistance capacity to future climate change. The objective was to test whether there is any variation in the carbon, water and nutrient status among different leaf ontogenetic stages in a bromeliad rosette subjected to a gradient of drought stress. We used a semi-controlled experiment consisting in a gradient of water shortage in Aechmea aquilega and Lutheria splendens. For each bromeliad and drought treatment, three leaves were collected based on their position in the rosette and several functional traits related to water and nutrient status, and carbon metabolism were measured. We found that water status traits (relative water content, leaf succulence, osmotic and midday water potentials) and carbon metabolism traits (carbon assimilation, maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, chlorophyll and starch contents) decreased with increasing drought stress, while leaf soluble sugars and carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus contents remained unchanged. The different leaf ontogenetic stages showed only marginal variations when subjected to a gradient of drought. Resources were not reallocated between different leaf ontogenetic stages but we found a reallocation of soluble sugars from leaf starch reserves to the root system. Both species were capable of metabolic and physiological adjustments in response to drought. Overall, this study advances our understanding of the resistance of bromeliads faced with increasing drought stress and paves the way for in-depth reflection on their strategies to cope with water shortage. © 2020 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society  
  Address Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse, 31062, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00319317 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PDF trop gros voir la documentaliste – merci Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 943  
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Author Maréchaux, I.; Bonal, D.; Bartlett, M.K.; Burban, B.; Coste, S.; Courtois, E.A.; Dulormne, M.; Goret, J.-Y.; Mira, E.; Mirabel, A.; Sack, L.; Stahl, C.; Chave, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Functional Ecology Abbreviated Journal Funct Ecol  
  Volume 32 Issue 10 Pages 2285-2297  
  Keywords drought tolerance; hydraulic conductance; sap flow; sapflux density; tropical trees; turgor loss point; water potential; wilting point  
  Abstract Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (pi-tlp), that is, a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for longer into a dry season. We measured sapflux density of 22 mature trees of 10 species during a dry season in an Amazonian rainforest, quantified sapflux decline as soil water content decreased and tested its relationship to tree pi-tlp, size and leaf predawn and midday water potentials measured after the onset of the dry season. The measured trees varied strongly in the response of water use to the seasonal drought, with sapflux at the end of the dry season ranging from 37 to 117% (on average 83 +/- 5 %) of that at the beginning of the dry season. The decline of water transport as soil dried was correlated with tree pi-tlp (Spearman's rho > 0.63), but not with tree size or predawn and midday water potentials. Thus, trees with more drought-tolerant leaves better maintained water transport during the seasonal drought. Our study provides an explicit correlation between a trait, measurable at the leaf level, and whole-plant performance under drying conditions. Physiological traits such as pi-tlp can be used to assess and model higher scale processes in response to drying conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/1365-2435.13188 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 830  
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Author Cochard, H.; Coste, S.; Chanson, B.; Guehl, J.M.; Nicolini, E. openurl 
  Title (up) Hydraulic architecture correlates with bud organogenesis and primary shoot growth in beech (Fagus sylvatica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Tree Physiology Abbreviated Journal Tree Physiol.  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 1545-1552  
  Keywords development; hydraulic conductance; leaf primordia; meristem; xylem  
  Abstract In beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the number of leaf primordia preformed in the buds determines the length and the type (long versus short) of annual growth units, and thus, branch growth and architecture. We analyzed the correlation between the number of leaf primordia and the hydraulic conductance of the vascular system connected to the buds. Terminal buds of short growth units and axillary buds of long growth units on lower branches of mature trees were examined. Buds with less than four and more than five leaf primordia formed short and long growth units, respectively. Irrespective of the type of growth unit the bud was formed on, the occurrence of a large number of leaf primordia was associated with high xylem hydraulic conductance. Xylem conductance was correlated to the area of the outermost annual ring. These results suggest that organogenesis and primary growth in buds correlates with secondary growth of the growth units and thus with their hydraulic architecture. Possible causal relationships between the variables are discussed.  
  Address INRA UBP, UMR PIAF, F-63039 Clermont Ferrand, France, Email: cochard@clermont.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher HERON PUBLISHING Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0829-318X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000234019900008 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 281  
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Author Aguilos, M.; Stahl, C.; Burban, B.; Hérault, B.; Courtois, E.; Coste, S.; Wagner, F.; Ziegler, C.; Takagi, K.; Bonal, D. pdf  url
doi  openurl
  Title (up) Interannual and seasonal variations in ecosystem transpiration and water use efficiency in a tropical rainforest Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Forests Abbreviated Journal Forests  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Drought; Evapotranspiration; Radiation; Tropical rainforest; Water use efficiency; Atmospheric radiation; Carbon dioxide; Climate change; Drought; Efficiency; Evapotranspiration; Forestry; Heat radiation; Radiation effects; Soil moisture; Tropics; Water supply; Climate condition; Drought conditions; Interannual variability; Mechanistic models; Seasonal variation; Tropical ecosystems; Tropical rain forest; Water use efficiency; Ecosystems  
  Abstract Warmer and drier climates over Amazonia have been predicted for the next century with expected changes in regional water and carbon cycles. We examined the impact of interannual and seasonal variations in climate conditions on ecosystem-level evapotranspiration (ET) and water use efficiency (WUE) to determine key climatic drivers and anticipate the response of these ecosystems to climate change. We used daily climate and eddyflux data recorded at the Guyaflux site in French Guiana from 2004 to 2014. ET and WUE exhibited weak interannual variability. The main climatic driver of ET and WUE was global radiation (Rg), but relative extractable water (REW) and soil temperature (Ts) did also contribute. At the seasonal scale, ET and WUE showed a modal pattern driven by Rg, with maximum values for ET in July and August and for WUE at the beginning of the year. By removing radiation effects during water depleted periods, we showed that soil water stress strongly reduced ET. In contrast, drought conditions enhanced radiation-normalized WUE in almost all the years, suggesting that the lack of soil water had a more severe effect on ecosystem evapotranspiration than on photosynthesis. Our results are of major concern for tropical ecosystem modeling because they suggest that under future climate conditions, tropical forest ecosystems will be able to simultaneously adjust CO2 and H2O fluxes. Yet, for tropical forests under future conditions, the direction of change in WUE at the ecosystem scale is hard to predict, since the impact of radiation on WUE is counterbalanced by adjustments to soil water limitations. Developing mechanistic models that fully integrate the processes associated with CO2 and H2O flux control should help researchers understand and simulate future functional adjustments in these ecosystems.  
  Address Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0808, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Mdpi Ag Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 19994907 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Export Date: 1 February 2019; Correspondence Address: Bonal, D.; Université de Lorraine, AgroParisTech, INRA, UMR SilvaFrance; email: damien.bonal@inra.fr; References: Von Randow, C., Zeri, M., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Muza, M.N., de Gonçalves, L.G.G., Costa, M.H., Araujo, A.C., Saleska, S.R., Interannual variability of carbon and water fluxes in Amazonian forest, Cerrado and pasture sites, as simulated by terrestrial biosphere models (2013) Agric. For. Meteorol, 182-183, pp. 145-155; Duffy, P.B., Brando, P., Asner, G.P., Field, C.B., Projections of future meteorological drought and wet periods in the Amazon (2015) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, pp. 13172-13177; Cox, P.M., Betts, R.A., Collins, M., Harris, P.P., Huntingford, C., Jones, C.D., Amazonian forest dieback under climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century (2004) Theor. Appl. Climatol, 78, pp. 137-156; Poulter, B., Hattermann, F., Hawkins, E., Zaehle, S., Sitch, S., Restrepo-Coupe, N., Heyder, U., Cramer, W., Robust dynamics of Amazon dieback to climate change with perturbed ecosystem model parameters (2010) Glob. Chang. Biol, 16, pp. 2476-2495; Saleska, S.R., Didan, K., Huete, A.R., Da Rocha, H.R., Amazon forests green-up during 2005 drought (2007) Science, 318, p. 612; Phillips, O.L., Aragão, L.E.O.C., Lewis, S.L., Fisher, J.B., Lloyd, J., López-González, G., Malhi, Y., Quesada, C.A., Drought sensitivity of the amazon rainforest (2009) Science, 323, pp. 1344-1347; Bonal, D., Burban, B., Stahl, C., Wagner, F., Hérault, B., The response of tropical rainforests to drought-Lessons from recent research and future prospects (2016) Ann. For. Sci, 73, pp. 27-44; Wang, K.C., Dickinson, R.E., A review of global terrestrial evapotranspiration: Observation, modeling, climatology, and climatic variability (2012) Rev. 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  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 856  
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