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Author Verryckt, L.T.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Vicca, S.; Van Langenhove, L.; Peñuelas, J.; Ciais, P.; Posada, J.M.; Stahl, C.; Coste, S.; Courtois, E.A.; Obersteiner, M.; Chave, J.; Janssens, I.A. doi  openurl
  Title Can light-saturated photosynthesis in lowland tropical forests be estimated by one light level? Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume (down) 52 Issue 6 Pages 1183-1193  
  Keywords canopy architecture; interspecific variation; light intensity; lowland environment; parameter estimation; photon flux density; photosynthesis; saturation; tropical forest; French Guiana  
  Abstract Leaf-level net photosynthesis (An) estimates and associated photosynthetic parameters are crucial for accurately parameterizing photosynthesis models. For tropical forests, such data are poorly available and collected at variable light conditions. To avoid over- or underestimation of modeled photosynthesis, it is critical to know at which photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) photosynthesis becomes light-saturated. We studied the dependence of An on PPFD in two tropical forests in French Guiana. We estimated the light saturation range, including the lowest PPFD level at which Asat (An at light saturation) is reached, as well as the PPFD range at which Asat remained unaltered. The light saturation range was derived from photosynthetic light-response curves, and within-canopy and interspecific differences were studied. We observed wide light saturation ranges of An. Light saturation ranges differed among canopy heights, but a PPFD level of 1,000 µmol m−2 s−1 was common across all heights, except for pioneer trees species that did not reach light saturation below 2,000 µmol m−2 s−1. A light intensity of 1,000 µmol m−2 s−1 sufficed for measuring Asat of climax species at our study sites, independent of the species or the canopy height. Because of the wide light saturation ranges, results from studies measuring Asat at higher PPFD levels (for upper canopy leaves up to 1,600 µmol m−2 s−1) are comparable with studies measuring at 1,000 µmol m−2 s−1. © 2020 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation  
  Address UMR 5174, Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00063606 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 948  
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Author Verryckt, L.T.; Van Langenhove, L.; Ciais, P.; Courtois, E.A.; Vicca, S.; Peñuelas, J.; Stahl, C.; Coste, S.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Posada, J.M.; Obersteiner, M.; Chave, J.; Janssens, I.A. doi  openurl
  Title Coping with branch excision when measuring leaf net photosynthetic rates in a lowland tropical forest Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume (down) 52 Issue 4 Pages 608-615  
  Keywords branch cutting; canopy physiology; French Guiana; gas exchange; photosynthesis; rainforest; stomatal conductance; ecological modeling; environmental conditions; forest canopy; leaf; measurement method; photosynthesis; tree; tropical forest; Gruidae  
  Abstract Measuring leaf gas exchange from canopy leaves is fundamental for our understanding of photosynthesis and for a realistic representation of carbon uptake in vegetation models. Since canopy leaves are often difficult to reach, especially in tropical forests with emergent trees up to 60 m at remote places, canopy access techniques such as canopy cranes or towers have facilitated photosynthetic measurements. These structures are expensive and therefore not very common. As an alternative, branches are often cut to enable leaf gas exchange measurements. The effect of branch excision on leaf gas exchange rates should be minimized and quantified to evaluate possible bias. We compared light-saturated leaf net photosynthetic rates measured on excised and intact branches. We selected branches positioned at three canopy positions, estimated relative to the top of the canopy: upper sunlit foliage, middle canopy foliage, and lower canopy foliage. We studied the variation of the effects of branch excision and transport among branches at these different heights in the canopy. After excision and transport, light-saturated leaf net photosynthetic rates were close to zero for most leaves due to stomatal closure. However, when the branch had acclimated to its new environmental conditions—which took on average 20 min—light-saturated leaf net photosynthetic rates did not significantly differ between the excised and intact branches. We therefore conclude that branch excision does not affect the measurement of light-saturated leaf net photosynthesis, provided that the branch is recut under water and is allowed sufficient time to acclimate to its new environmental conditions. © 2020 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation  
  Address UMR 5174 Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, Université Paul Sabatier, CNRS, Toulouse, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 00063606 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 960  
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Author Biwolé, A.B.; Dainou, K.; Fayolle, A.; Hardy, O.J.; Brostaux, Y.; Coste, S.; Delion, S.; Betti, J.L.; Doucet, J.-L. doi  openurl
  Title Light Response of Seedlings of a Central African Timber Tree Species, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), and the Definition of Light Requirements Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Biotropica Abbreviated Journal Biotropica  
  Volume (down) 47 Issue 6 Pages 681-688  
  Keywords biomass allocation; Central Africa; light requirement: Lophira alata; population; relative growth rate; seedling growth; timber species; Afrique centrale; allocation de biomasse; besoins en lumière; croissance des semis; bois d'œuvre; Lophira alata; population; taux de croissance relatif  
  Abstract Light is of primary importance in structuring tropical tree communities. Light exposure at seedling and adult stages has been used to characterize the ecological profile of tropical trees, with many implications in forest management and restoration ecology. Most shade-tolerance classification systems have been proposed based on empirical observations in a specific area and thus result in contradictions among categories assigned to a given species. In this study, we aimed to quantify the light requirements for seedling growth of a Central African timber tree, Lophira alata (Ochnaceae), taking into account effects of population origin. In two controlled experiments: a light response experiment and a comparative population experiment, conducted in southwestern Cameroon, using seeds collected from four populations (three from Cameroon and one from Gabon), we examined the quantitative responses to irradiance of seedlings. After 2 years, mortality was very low (<3%), even in extremely low irradiance. Growth and biomass allocation patterns varied in response to light, with intermediate irradiance (24–43%) providing optimal conditions. Light response differed between populations. The Boumba population in the northeastern edge of the species' distribution exhibited the highest light requirements, suggesting a local adaptation. As a result of positive growth at low irradiance and maximum growth at intermediate irradiance, we concluded that L. alata exhibits characteristics of both non-pioneer and pioneer species. Implications of our results to propose an objective way to assign the light requirement for tropical tree species are discussed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-7429 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 648  
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Author Levionnois, S.; Coste, S.; Nicolini, E.; Stahl, C.; Morel, H.; Heuret, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Scaling of petiole anatomies, mechanics and vasculatures with leaf size in the widespread Neotropical pioneer tree species Cecropia obtusa Trécul (Urticaceae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Tree physiology Abbreviated Journal Tree Physiol.  
  Volume (down) 40 Issue 2 Pages 245-258  
  Keywords allometry; leaf size; petiole anatomy; scaling; theoretical hydraulic conductivity; vessel widening; xylem  
  Abstract Although the leaf economic spectrum has deepened our understanding of leaf trait variability, little is known about how leaf traits scale with leaf area. This uncertainty has resulted in the assumption that leaf traits should vary by keeping the same pace of variation with increases in leaf area across the leaf size range. We evaluated the scaling of morphological, tissue-surface and vascular traits with overall leaf area, and the functional significance of such scaling. We examined 1,271 leaves for morphological traits, and 124 leaves for anatomical and hydraulic traits, from 38 trees of Cecropia obtusa Trécul (Urticaceae) in French Guiana. Cecropia is a Neotropical genus of pioneer trees that can exhibit large laminas (0.4 m2 for C. obtusa), with leaf size ranging by two orders of magnitude. We measured (i) tissue fractions within petioles and their second moment of area, (ii) theoretical xylem hydraulic efficiency of petioles and (iii) the extent of leaf vessel widening within the hydraulic path. We found that different scaling of morphological trait variability allows for optimisation of lamina display among larger leaves, especially the positive allometric relationship between lamina area and petiole cross-sectional area. Increasing the fraction of pith is a key factor that increases the geometrical effect of supportive tissues on mechanical rigidity and thereby increases carbon-use efficiency. We found that increasing xylem hydraulic efficiency with vessel size results in lower leaf lamina area: xylem ratios, which also results in potential carbon savings for large leaves. We found that the vessel widening is consistent with hydraulic optimisation models. Leaf size variability modifies scaling of leaf traits in this large-leaved species. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permission@oup.com.  
  Address UMR AMAP, CIRAD, CNRS, IRD, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, 34398, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher NLM (Medline) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 17584469 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Export Date: 16 March 2020 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 921  
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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Sonnier, G.; Dreyer, E. openurl 
  Title Similar irradiance-elicited plasticity of leaf traits in saplings of 12 tropical rainforest tree species with highly different leaf mass to area ratio Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Functional Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Funct. Plant Biol.  
  Volume (down) 37 Issue 4 Pages 342-355  
  Keywords functional diversity; light availability; photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency; photosynthetic capacity; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract Leaf traits of tropical tree species display an important inter-specific diversity, as detected for instance in the large range of values of leaf mass : area ratio (LMA). They also demonstrate a large irradiance-elicited plasticity, but there is still debate whether this plasticity differs among species. To address this question, leaf traits were recorded on saplings from 12 rainforest tree species in French Guiana, grown under approximately 5, 10 and 20% relative irradiance. Fifteen structural and physiological leaf traits related to photosynthesis were measured. The irradiance-elicited plasticity was quantified using a relative distance plasticity index. A large inter-specific diversity was detected for all leaf traits. A principal component analysis opposed species with a large mass-based photosynthesis, respiration, N content and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, to species with a large leaf mass : area ratio, LMA. The two pioneer species used in this study displayed the largest photosynthetic capacity (and lowest LMA) and ranked at one end of the species continuum. Relative irradiance affected almost all traits with the exception of mass-based photosynthesis. A weak interaction was found between species and relative irradiance and the species ranking was maintained among relative irradiance treatments for the majority of the traits. A principal component analysis of the values of relative-distance plasticity index failed to reveal any consistent patterns of traits or species. We concluded that irradiance-elicited plasticity of leaf traits was similar among species irrespective of LMA and successional status, despite the occurrence of a large inter-specific diversity for the investigated traits.  
  Address [Dreyer, Erwin] Nancy Univ, INRA, UMR Ecol & Ecophysiol Forestieres 1137, IFR Ecosyst Forestiers Agroressources Biomol & Al, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher CSIRO PUBLISHING Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1445-4408 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000275979100009 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 63  
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