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Author Ziegler, C.; Coste, S.; Stahl, C.; Delzon, S.; Levionnois, S.; Cazal, J.; Cochard, H.; Esquivel-Muelbert, A.; Goret, J.-Y.; Heuret, P.; Jaouen, G.; Santiago, L.S.; Bonal, D. url  doi
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  Title Large hydraulic safety margins protect Neotropical canopy rainforest tree species against hydraulic failure during drought Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. Forest Sci.  
  Volume (down) 76 Issue 4 Pages 115  
  Keywords Amazon rainforest; Embolism resistance; Hydraulic safety margins; Turgor loss point; Water potential  
  Abstract Key message: Abundant Neotropical canopy-tree species are more resistant to drought-induced branch embolism than what is currently admitted. Large hydraulic safety margins protect them from hydraulic failure under actual drought conditions. Context: Xylem vulnerability to embolism, which is associated to survival under extreme drought conditions, is being increasingly studied in the tropics, but data on the risk of hydraulic failure for lowland Neotropical rainforest canopy-tree species, thought to be highly vulnerable, are lacking. Aims: The purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge on species drought-resistance characteristics in branches and leaves and the risk of hydraulic failure of abundant rainforest canopy-tree species during the dry season. Methods: We first assessed the range of branch xylem vulnerability to embolism using the flow-centrifuge technique on 1-m-long sun-exposed branches and evaluated hydraulic safety margins with leaf turgor loss point and midday water potential during normal- and severe-intensity dry seasons for a large set of Amazonian rainforest canopy-tree species. Results: Tree species exhibited a broad range of embolism resistance, with the pressure threshold inducing 50% loss of branch hydraulic conductivity varying from − 1.86 to − 7.63 MPa. Conversely, we found low variability in leaf turgor loss point and dry season midday leaf water potential, and mostly large, positive hydraulic safety margins. Conclusions: Rainforest canopy-tree species growing under elevated mean annual precipitation can have high resistance to embolism and are more resistant than what was previously thought. Thanks to early leaf turgor loss and high embolism resistance, most species have a low risk of hydraulic failure and are well able to withstand normal and even severe dry seasons. © 2019, The Author(s).  
  Address Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa, Ancon, Panama  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 12864560 (Issn) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 901  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Coste, S.; Baraloto, C.; Leroy, C.; Marcon, E.; Renaud, A.; Richardson, A.D.; Roggy, J.C.; Schimann, H.; Uddling, J.; Herault, B. openurl 
  Title Assessing foliar chlorophyll contents with the SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter: a calibration test with thirteen tree species of tropical rainforest in French Guiana Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. For. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 67 Issue 6 Pages 607  
  Keywords chlorophyll estimate; model calibration; homographic functions; neotropical trees  
  Abstract Chlorophyll meters such as the SPAD-502 offer a simple, inexpensive and rapid method to estimate foliar chlorophyll content. However, values provided by SPAD-502 are unitless and require empirical calibrations between SPAD units and extracted chlorophyll values. Leaves of 13 tree species from the tropical rain forest in French Guiana were sampled to select the most appropriate calibration model among the often-used linear, polynomial and exponential models, in addition to a novel homographic model that has a natural asymptote. The homographic model best accurately predicted total chlorophyll content (mu g cm(-2)) from SPAD units (R-2 = 0.89). Interspecific differences in the homographic model parameters explain less than 7% of the variation in chlorophyll content in our data set. The utility of the general homographic model for a variety of research and management applications clearly outweighs the slight loss of model accuracy due to the abandon of the species' effect.  
  Address [Herault, Bruno] Univ Antilles Guyane, Unite Mixte Rech Ecol Forets Guyane, Kourou, France, Email: bruno.herault@ecofog.gf  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP SCIENCES S A Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1286-4560 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000282350300007 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 40  
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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Garraud, L.; Heuret, P.; Nicolini, E.; Dreyer, E. openurl 
  Title Does ontogeny modulate irradiance-elicited plasticity of leaf traits in saplings of rain-forest tree species? A test with Dicorynia guianensis and Tachigali melinonii (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. For. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 66 Issue 7 Pages 701-709  
  Keywords plant architecture; phenotypic plasticity; photosynthetic capacity; leaf structure; tropical rain forest  
  Abstract Irradiance elicits a large plasticity in leaf traits, but little is known about the modulation of this plasticity by ontogeny. Interactive effects of relative irradiance and ontogeny were assessed on leaf traits for two tropical rainforest tree species: Dicorynia guianensis Amshoff and Tachigali melinonii (Harms) Barneby (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae). Eleven morphological and physiological leaf traits, relative to photosynthetic performance, were measured on saplings at three different architectural development stages (ASD 1, 2 and 3) and used to derive composite traits like photosynthetic N-use efficiency. Measurements were made along a natural irradiance gradient. The effect of ASD was very visible and differed between the two species. For Dicorynia guianensis, only leaf mass-per-area (LMA) significantly increased with ASDs whereas for Tachigali melinonii, almost all traits were affected by ASD: LMA, leaf N content and photosynthetic capacity increased from ASD 1 to ASD 3. Photosynthetic N-use-efficiency was not affected by ASD in any species. Leaf traits were severely modulated by irradiance, whereas the degree of plasticity was very similar among ASDs. Only few interactions were detected between irradiance and ASD, for leaf thickness, carbon content, and the ratio Chl/N in T. melinonii and for photosynthetic capacity in D. guianensis. We conclude that ontogenic development and irradiance-elicited plasticity modulated leaf traits, with almost no interaction, i.e., the degree of irradiance-elicited plasticity was stable across development stages and independent of ontogeny in these two species, at least in the early stages of development assessed here.  
  Address [Dreyer, Erwin] INRA, UMR Ecol & Ecophysiol Forestieres 1137, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP SCIENCES S A Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1286-4560 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000270906600009 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 100  
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Author Bonal, D.; Born, C.; Brechet, C.; Coste, S.; Marcon, E.; Roggy, J.C.; Guehl, J.M. openurl 
  Title The successional status of tropical rainforest tree species is associated with differences in leaf carbon isotope discrimination and functional traits Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Annals of Forest Science Abbreviated Journal Ann. For. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 64 Issue 2 Pages 169-176  
  Keywords C-13; functional diversity; leaf gas exchange; species grouping; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract We characterised the among species variability in leaf gas exchange and morphological traits under controlled conditions of seedlings of 22 tropical rainforest canopy species to understand the origin of the variability in leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Delta) among species with different growth and dynamic characteristics (successional gradient). Our results first suggest that these species pursue a consistent strategy in terms of. throughout their ontogeny (juveniles grown here versus canopy adult trees from the natural forest). Second, leaf Delta was negatively correlated with WUE and N, and positively correlated with g(s), but among species differences in Delta were mainly explained by differences in WUE. Finally, species belonging to different successional groups display distinct leaf functional and morphological traits. We confirmed that fast growing early successional species maximise carbon assimilation with high stomatal conductance. In contrast, fast and slow growing late successional species are both characterised by low carbon assimilation values, but by distinct stomatal conductance and leaf morphological features. Along the successional gradient, these differences result in much lower Delta for the intermediate species (i.e. fast growing late successional) as compared to the two other groups.  
  Address INRA Kourou, UMR Ecol Forets Guyane, F-97387 Kourou, Guyane, France, Email: damien.bonal@kourou.cirad.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP SCIENCES S A Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1286-4560 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ISI:000244438100006 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ eric.marcon @ Serial 169  
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Author Coste, S.; Roggy, J.C.; Schimann, H.; Epron, D.; Dreyer, E. pdf  openurl
  Title A cost-benefit analysis of acclimation to low irradiance in tropical rainforest tree seedlings: leaf life span and payback time for leaf deployment Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Bot.  
  Volume (down) 62 Issue 11 Pages 3941-3955  
  Keywords Carbon balance; construction cost; functional diversity; leaf life span; payback time; photosynthesis; tropical rainforest  
  Abstract The maintenance in the long run of a positive carbon balance under very low irradiance is a prerequisite for survival of tree seedlings below the canopy or in small gaps in a tropical rainforest. To provide a quantitative basis for this assumption, experiments were carried out to determine whether construction cost (CC) and payback time for leaves and support structures, as well as leaf life span (i) differ among species and (ii) display an irradiance-elicited plasticity. Experiments were also conducted to determine whether leaf life span correlates to CC and payback time and is close to the optimal longevity derived from an optimization model. Saplings from 13 tropical tree species were grown under three levels of irradiance. Specific-CC was computed, as well as CC scaled to leaf area at the metamer level. Photosynthesis was recorded over the leaf life span. Payback time was derived from CC and a simple photosynthesis model. Specific-CC displayed only little interspecific variability and irradiance-elicited plasticity, in contrast to CC scaled to leaf area. Leaf life span ranged from 4 months to > 26 months among species, and was longest in seedlings grown under lowest irradiance. It was always much longer than payback time, even under the lowest irradiance. Leaves were shed when their photosynthesis had reached very low values, in contrast to what was predicted by an optimality model. The species ranking for the different traits was stable across irradiance treatments. The two pioneer species always displayed the smallest CC, leaf life span, and payback time. All species displayed a similar large irradiance-elicited plasticity.  
  Address [Coste, S; Epron, D; Dreyer, E] INRA, UMR1137, Ctr INRA Nancy, F-54280 Champenoux, France, Email: dreyer@nancy.inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0957 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000292838700021 Approved no  
  Call Number EcoFoG @ webmaster @ Serial 331  
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